Tyll Hertsens  |  Mar 11, 2018  |  13 comments
For those of you who just stumbled across this InnerFidelity review as you were looking for information about the Skullcandy Crusher Wireless, welcome! InnerFidelity is a website for hard core headphone enthusiasts and it's likely you've never read headphone reviews like the ones here. I'll be going on in some detail about the technicalities of this headphone and that will probably bore you. So, I'll save you some time. I don't think the Crusher is a good sounding headphone, even for bass-heads. Let me recommend you take a look at the InnerFidelity reviews of the comparably priced Sennheiser HD 4.40 BT ($149) and the more expensive but better sounding Beats Solo3 Wireless ($299).

For the rest of you headphone geeks, I'm sure you've not been chomping at the bit for a Crusher audition, but given the haptic (vibration) transducer intended to produce the feeling of low bass response, I think it's a headphone worthy of a little satisfied curiosity. Let's have a look.

Tyll Hertsens  |  Mar 07, 2018  |  27 comments
Thing is, the AirPod sensors are primarily to improve its performance as a fitness earphone, which is something not really needed for a full size "high-end" headphone. Why would Apple want a high-end headphone if it's not going to have all the sensors when they have a perfectly good quality headphone maker in Beats? ( I do think their quality went up dramatically in their releases over the last two years.) I think it's a strategic move.
Tyll Hertsens  |  Mar 04, 2018  |  41 comments
Like pretty much all headphone makers, I've found HiFiMAN planar magnetic headphones a little hit and miss. Some have been a too bright and sizzly, some have not had the build quality I'd like to see at the price. On the other hand there have been some really nice surprises. The HE1000 had an uncannily pleasant, floating in the clouds, sonic character, and the HE-400S was dandy at a very affordable price. One thing has been very consistant though, the folks at HiFiMAN keep trying...and that's turning out to be a very good thing.
Jana Dagdagan  |  Feb 28, 2018  |  4 comments
In part 2 of her CanJam New York 2018 report, Jana visits: Campfire Audio; Cayin; ZMF; Mytek; and Meze for a look at their new products.
Jana Dagdagan  |  Feb 27, 2018  |  13 comments
Jude and crew have done an amazing job of putting the world of headphones under one roof. Well...many roofs...all over the world. If you're interested in attending one, check out the schedule here.

I needed to buckle down and get a bunch of headphones reviewed, so CanJam New York wasn't in the plan for me, but Jana Dagdagan heard the siren call. Here's the first of two posts where Jana takes us along for a visit to the show.

Tyll Hertsens  |  Feb 23, 2018  |  15 comments
It was a real treat being able to talk with Paul Barton about the PSB M4U 8 and NAD HP70 at RMAF last year. Paul has lead acoustic design for PSB, NAD, and Bluesound for a long, long time now; he's got a strong understanding of audio and when he designs a product it speaks of this knowledge. In listening to this headphone, I find myself listening to both the headphone and what Paul may be trying to tell us with them. It's been an interesting dialog.
Tyll Hertsens  |  Feb 16, 2018  |  33 comments
I'm in the midst of reviewing a couple of Bluetooth noise canceling headphones. It seems to me these headphones have good tuning for movies and telecom as they seem to bring out speech intelligibility quite well. But I'm not sure I like the tuning for music.

It has me wondering though, maybe tunings for mobile headphones that are often used for movies, telecom, and YouTubes should be different than cans used primarily for music. I'm quite curious if InnerFidelity readers think one tuning fits all listening situations, or if different tunings might be prefered. What do you think?

Should headphones for mobile use have a different tuning than headphones for music listening only?
Flat is flat. Neutral is the goal in all cases. That's hard enough...don't make it harder.
32% (23 votes)
Some small differences might be worthwhile, but you must be able to switch back to neutral at will.
38% (27 votes)
Sure, it's likely there's a better tuning for portable cans. Serious music listening should use wires anyway.
31% (22 votes)
Total votes: 72
Tyll Hertsens  |  Feb 11, 2018  |  29 comments
It's deja vu all over again. Maybe Audeze decided to reverse the trend for ever more expensive headphones. Maybe they were just aware of so many people longing for the LCD2 of old. But whatever the reson, I do like seeing them breath new life into the more affordable end of the LCD line-up with their newly released LCD2 Classic.
John Grandberg  |  Feb 06, 2018  |  17 comments
Word on the street is that iRiver, parent company of the Astell&Kern brand, tapped a whole different design team to work on the KANN. I haven't been able to confirm this, but it certainly fits with the device being so different from prior AK designs. Is that a good thing? Let's find out.
Tyll Hertsens  |  Feb 03, 2018  |  12 comments
One of a nice handfull of $500ish planar magnetic headphones at the show, I was impressed with the Advanced Alpha at CanJam@RMAF last October. In my report I said:

Maybe it was just the show conditions, or maybe I was just in the right mood, but holy smoke these sounded really good to me on first listen. I've been wrong at shows before so don't take this as gospel, but I sure liked these Advanced planar magnetic cans.

Well, time to find out if we can trust my ears at shows.